jokes

fealinx:

1.
knock knock
who’s there
boo
boo who
i know, man, i’m really sad too
don’t act like you understand
i think i understand a little
you don’t understand anything at all
well then explain it to me
it’s not worth it
c’mon, we’ll have a few drinks and we’ll talk it over
i can’t

nobodylv:

Los Angeles, 2019

Blade Runner (1982) dir. Ridley Scott

García Márquez / Kurosawa

kino-obscura:

David Liu | 20 September 2014

image

In October 1990, Gabriel García Márquez visited Tokyo during the shooting of Akira Kurosawa’s penultimate feature, Rhapsody in August. García Márquez, who spent some years in Bogota as a film critic before penning landmark novels such as One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera, spoke with Kurosawa for over six hours on a number of subjects. Below is a partial transcription of the conversation, first published by the Los Angeles Times in 1991.


Gabriel García Márquez: I don’t want this conversation between friends to seem like a press interview, but I just have this great curiosity to know a great many other things about you and your work. To begin with, I am interested to know how you write your scripts. First, because I am myself a scriptwriter. And second, because you have made stupendous adaptations of great literary works, and I have many doubts about the adaptations that have been made or could be made of mine.

Akira Kurosawa: When I conceive an original idea that I wish to turn into a script, I lock myself up in a hotel with paper and pencil. At that point I have a general idea of the plot, and I know more or less how it is going to end. If I don’t know what scene to begin with, I follow the stream of the ideas that spring up naturally.

García Márquez: Is the first thing that comes to your mind an idea or an image?

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Charles Laughton and Robert Mitchum on the set of Night of the Hunter

Charles Laughton and Robert Mitchum on the set of Night of the Hunter

lottereinigerforever:

Ennio Guarnieri, Nico & Federico Fellini on the set of “La Dolce Vita” photographed by Arturo Zavattini

lottereinigerforever:

Ennio Guarnieri, Nico & Federico Fellini on the set of “La Dolce Vita” photographed by Arturo Zavattini


photo: mila reynaud 

photo: mila reynaud 


Marilyn Monroe by Carl Perutz, 1958.

Marilyn Monroe by Carl Perutz, 1958.

avocadohalves:

 

Sinead O’Connor, 1988

avocadohalves:

 

Sinead O’Connor, 1988

lottereinigerforever:

Giulietta Masina, Federico Fellini & crew on the set of “Le Notti di Cabiria”

lottereinigerforever:

Giulietta Masina, Federico Fellini & crew on the set of “Le Notti di Cabiria”

vintagegal:

Traci Lords during the filming of John Waters’ Cry-Baby (1990)

vintagegal:

Traci Lords during the filming of John Waters’ Cry-Baby (1990)

unadoptable:

Blob characters who are best friends

unadoptable:

Blob characters who are best friends

skinks:

remember 2001-2004 though???!? remember windows xp and kerrang and neopets and shrek being a big deal and beyblades and ps2 skating/snowboarding games and “i believe in a thing called love” and flash video sites and avril lavigne and wearing chains on jeans and t.A.T.u. and seeing LOTR and PotC in cinemas and how every boy looked like reese from malcolm in the middle

So if we wanted to watch some French animation, what films would you suggest? — Asked by Anonymous

pumpkinspiceaddiction:

the Triplets of Belleville is about an elderly woman searching for her son who was kidnapped in the middle of a Tour de France race. It’s largely free of dialogue, but the sound effects and such are wonderful. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature—it lost to Finding Nemo.

A Cat in Paris is about a young girl and her cat who discover mysteries in the course of one night. It was also nominated for an Oscar for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Rango.

Persepolis is based on an autobiographical graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi about her early life in Iran. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Ratatouille.

the Illusionist is about an aging magician and an imaginative young girl who form a father/daughter relationship. It was also nominated for a Best Animation Oscar, but lost to Toy Story 3.

The Rabbi’s Cat is a story about a cat who swallows a parrot and gains the ability to speak like a human. It is set in 1920’s Algeria.

Ernest & Celestine is the adorable story about a big bear and a little mouse who forge an unlikely friendship. It was also nominated for an Oscar in Best Animated Picture, but lost to Frozen.

Kirikou and the Sorceress is a story inspired by West African folklore that tells the story of Kirikou, a boy who was born with the ability to walk and talk, who saves his people from an evil witch. The film was popular enough to spawn sequels and a stage adaptation.

A Monster in Paris is a 3D animated musical film that is reaaaaalllly loosely based on the Phantom of the Opera. It’s set in 1910 and is about, surprisingly, a monster that lives in Paris, and his love for a young singer.

The King and the Mockingbird is an 80’s film about a cruel king titled Charles V + III = VIII + VIII = XVI, who is obsessed with a young shepherdess, and whose attempts to capture the young girl are thwarted by a mockingbird whose wife the King had previously killed.  

Those are probably the most famous of the feature length animated films.

But the animated short films are just as glorious. Here’s a compilation of a bunch of short films and I can link you to others as well. 

Sorry for the long answer but I just really love French animation.